So Neanderthals made abstract art? This astounding discovery humbles every human

Scientists say cave paintings in Spain, thought to have been by our ancestors, were actually by Neanderthals. So did they teach us everything we know? If you go to the painted caves of Spain and France, crawl through narrow passages and keep your balance on slippery rock floors, you reach the hidden places where ice age hunters made their marks tens of thousands of years ago. Nothing seems more startling than the way they placed hands against the cold rock and blew red ochre out of their mouths to leave…

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How men can show solidarity with the #MeToo movement | Emily Reynolds

Here’s some advice: call each other out, ask women questions and listen. If you do nothing now, you’re complicit Even if you’re a fan of celebrity culture, you probably won’t have predicted that the red carpet was about to become one of 2018’s most visible and widely-reported protests. But it has. It all kicked off at the Golden Globes, with stars wearing black to support the Time’s Up movement (actors also wore emeralds, apparently to signify hope, in perhaps one of the more myopic, media-bubble iterations of modern protest seen…

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Thomasina Miers’ recipe for smoked haddock souffle with sheep’s cheese

Souffles are so versatile, and make stars of all kinds of ingredients – and they’re not tricky at all. Honest There is something inherently thrilling about pulling a light, barely quivering souffle from the oven: on the one hand so pure, on the other so wanton. Souffles are ingeniously versatile, and make all sorts the stars of the show, from healthy greens to fruit and ground nuts. And the results always look fabulous. Most of all, a souffle is a brilliant bet for a low-cost, delicious dinner, as here, where…

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'Here we don't have to hide our ambition': the rise of the women-only workspace

In-house yoga, comfy sofas, film nights: is a new breed of women-only members’ clubs the way to get ahead at work? It’s a drizzly, cold evening in January. The steps outside 11 Rathbone Place, a five-storey Georgian townhouse just off London’s Oxford Street, are covered in brick dust and the door – nondescript, black, chipped – has electrical tape stuck to it. A slogan plastered across the huge front windows paraphrases Virginia Woolf: “A woman must have money and a room of her own.” I press the bell, which looks…

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