THE FLOOD TIDE.

WHATEVER the future may conceal in its womb, there is no doubt that for the moment Mr. Gandhi’s scheme is carrying everything before it. Large numbers of people, probably the largest that have ever been affected by a political movement in India within so short a time after its birth, are being literally borne on the flood-tide of enthusiasm. At the Social Congress in Calcutta less than two months ago, Mr. Gandhi had a bare majority in the Subjects Committee and the minority that opposed him in the open Congress…

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SOME BASIC CONSIDERATIONS.

WE have endeavoured to show that the simultaneous and universal boycott of educational institutions with which either the Government or the University has anything to do, that seems to be under contemplation at the present time, is not sanctioned either by the Congress resolution or by the All-India Congress Committee. But this is clearly no formidable objection from Mr. Gandhi’s point of view. He can say that the movement was not originated by the Congress, that it had been actually in operation for over a month when the Congress sanctioned…

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Watching Japan

JAPAN is evidently having second thoughts on its vow never to make nuclear weapons. Till now the world had been led to believe that even if the nation wanted or had the power to make the weapons, its constitutional commitment in this respect would come in the way. Now, the Japanese Government has issued a defence white paper — the first of its kind since the Second World War — with a new interpretation of the constitution to the effect that there is nothing in it to prevent the nation…

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BOYCOTT of SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.

NO single item in the non-co-operation programme of Mr. Gandhi has evoked such strong and energetic opposition among a very large number of thinking and patriotic Indians as that relating to the withdrawal of students from Government or Government-controlled schools and colleges. The President of the Special Session himself set the ball rolling. “He was,” he said, “whole-heartedly opposed to the withdrawal of boys from schools and colleges. He did not accept that proposition at all. It would be suicidal at the present moment to withdraw their boys and girls…

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THE “GAZETTE” AND PANDIT MALAVIYA’S SCHEME.

THE local Anglo-Indian journal professes not to understand Pandit Malaviya’s scheme. “Despite the lengthy exposition of its aim in The Tribune,” it writes, “we must confess to be rather at a loss to know what the Pandit intends to do.” We sympathise with the journal, but do not know how to help it in its difficulty. In the present case the writer appears to have a very clear idea of the Pandit’s intentions. He knows that the Pandit has proposed “a scheme for reconstituting the Congress on a representative basis,”…

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AN IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

SIR Sam Hughes’s motion in the Canadian Parliament “advocating an Imperial Parliament in which the whole Empire might be represented to deal only with imperial and international questions, over which it might exercise authority without infringing the material privilege at present enjoyed by various parts of the Empire”, raises a question of interest, which has again been discussed in the past, but the solution still seems distant. Except in form, the present proposal is identical with that made by Seeley in his lectures on the expansion of England in the…

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PANDIT MALAVIYA’S DECISION.

WHILE it is certain that the decision of Pandit Malaviya not to offer himself for election to any of the reformed Councils will cause widespread regret among the minority of Congressmen who, despite the resolution of the Special Congress, have persisted in their determination to go to the Councils, and bitter disappointment among those moderate politicians who have been looking forward to a strengthening of their ranks by a reunion with the Pandit and, through him with other Congressmen, it is equally certain that the reasons given by the Pandit…

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“There is no historic parallel.”

ANOTHER argument against the alternative scheme is that there is no instance in history of a people in our position having, in order to win its freedom, actually set up a non-official Parliament working side by side with the official Parliament. The argument might have had some force a couple of years ago, but has none today. Ireland is not yet free, but everybody knows that she has not only set up a Parliament but practically a State of her own, which in important departments of life has actually ousted…

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THE ALTERNATIVE SCHEME-II

THE first part of the question with which we concluded our leading article yesterday is easily answered. It is true that we cannot have a sufficient number of workers for the movement insisted by Pandit Malaviya except by withdrawing, whether partially or wholly, the power of our youth and manhood from the services and the learned professions and services and diverting their energies into this new channel of intensely patriotic activity. But there is a great difference between a wholesale negative movement of dissociation from the existing administration, and a…

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THE ALTERNATIVE SCHEME — 1

THE scheme of a reconstituted Congress which Pandit Madan Mohan Malaviya has placed before the country and which he expounded at some length in his Bradlaugh Hall speech on Wednesday, though apparently an alternative to the only other scheme before the country, has this great advantage that it is just as compatible with that scheme as with any other inspired by the same ultimate purpose. The plain fact is that whether we are non-co-operators of one description or another, or are believers in the Liberal doctrine of “co-operation where possible…

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