Air pollution may hinder India’s fight against COVID-19, say scientists

New Delhi, October 26 The causal link between air pollution and COVID-19 cases is yet to be established conclusively but long-term exposure will certainly make people more vulnerable to lung infections, warn scientists as the skies over large parts of north India, including Delhi, turn smoky and the air quality deteriorates rapidly. Their concerns come amid several global studies pointing to the possible connection between higher air pollution levels and increased COVID-19 cases and deaths. A study by researchers at Harvard University in the US in September showed that an…

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Ban on public events can bring down COVID-19 transmission rate by 24 per cent: Lancet study

London, October 26 Ban on public events can bring down the COVID-19 reproduction number ‘R’ number—a key measure of virus transmission—by 24 per cent in less than a month, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet journal. An R value above 1 indicates a growing outbreak, whereas an R value below 1 indicates a shrinking outbreak. The research using data from 131 countries suggests that individual measures, including closure of schools and workplaces, ban on public events and gatherings of more than 10 people, requirements to stay at…

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AI can predict students’ educational outcomes based on tweets

New Delhi, October 26 Dear parents, please note. You may not need to ask teachers how your kid is performing in studies as his or her tweets will be enough to gauge whether he or she will make it big in the future or not, thanks to Artificial Intelligence (AI). A team of Russian researchers has used AI-based models to predict high academic achievers from lower ones based on their social media posts. The prediction model uses a mathematical textual analysis that registers users’ vocabulary (its range and the semantic…

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Indian, Pakistani women diagnosed with more aggressive breast cancer at younger age: Study

Houston, October 26 Indian and Pakistani women are diagnosed with breast cancer, including more aggressive forms, at a younger age, according to a study that provides an insight into understanding the risk factors influencing the disease. The study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, examined the characteristics of breast cancer among Indian and Pakistani-American and non-Hispanic white women in the US using data from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program. Both, Indian and Pakistani women are diagnosed with more aggressive forms of the disease, at…

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